Tag Archives: Scottish writing

Interview on Minor Lits + review

Here’s an interview with me on writing, darkness, little fish and knife fighting in the afterlife:

 

You’re now published by one of the most exciting indie presses around, 404 Ink – how do you think the rise of micro presses like this have changed the literary landscape, and what has it meant for you as a writer?

I think small presses have made it possible for the literary scene to be more diverse than it would otherwise be – they are like little rockpools carved out by hand, full of life…

 

read the full thing here

 

A kind, sharp review of Mayhem & Death appeared on the Never Imitate blog:

 

Deep within the bowels of her carefully chosen words, reflections of the ordinary are made dark, lonely, threatening. However inspiring the view on the surface of an individual’s life may be, under McClory’s piercing gaze its desolate depths are revealed.

 

This is, the reviewer says, a good thing. Read the rest here.

 

 

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Filed under 404 Ink, experimental fiction, Helen McClory, Mayhem & Death, On The Edges of Vision, Scotland, The Goldblum Variations

No Longer Naked

The covers for Mayhem & Death and On the Edges of Vision are here!

 

md-final-cover   oteov-cover

 

I think they’re stunning & perfectly eerie.

 

Mayhem & Death is a brand-new story collection which also includes Powdered Milk, a novella, along with woodcut illustrations to go with each story. You can pre-order it from 404 Ink here.

 

On the Edges of Vision was first published in 2015 and won the Saltire First Book of the Year. This reissue brings it back into print for the first time since then, and I’m so delighted 404 Ink have chosen to do so. You can pre-order it here.

 

Or – if you’re a little canny and want to have both, you can buy the bundle, and save a little in the process here.

 

 

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Filed under 404 Ink, art, book cover, experimental fiction, Helen McClory, Illustration, Mayhem & Death, On The Edges of Vision, reading, Uncategorized

The Unsung Letter No. 16

This week’s Unsung Letter is all about teenage passions of the reading kind:

 

The books that I read at fourteen, fifteen, sixteen were just the ones my mum had in the house, those she’d noticed reviewed in The Scotsman or The List in those years. She treated herself to a new book every couple of months and they were almost always by Scottish authors at that time. Janice Galloway, The Trick Is To Keep Breathing. AL Kennedy, Looking For The Possible Dance. Alasdair Grey, A History Maker. Trainspotting, OBVIOUSLY. This was just what adults read, I thought

 

Read more – sign up here!

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