Tag Archives: flesh of the peach

ScotLitFest workshop + some reviews + an interview

 

The second #ScotLitFest is coming up this weekend!

 

There are lots of things planned for this online book festival (for the full catalogue check out their website)  – my event is an online flash fiction workshop, taking place on Facebook on Sunday between 1-2pm (BST). To sign up for a place, tweet ScotLitFest (through this link) and ask to be added. Alternatively, contact them through the ScotLitFest Facebook page. There will be writing prompts, a bit of feedback, tips for revision and a recommended reading list to help you with your writing, and I can’t wait!

 

In other news, there have been a few thoughtful, generous reviews of Flesh of the Peach recently – including The Writes of Woman, The Bottle Imp,  Scots Whay Hae and The F Word. For more, check out my Press tab, recently updated.

 

Naomi at The Writes of Woman interviewed me when I was down in London, and she had some fantastic questions for me.  Make yourself a cup of tea and have a listen. The real star may be my hands, which are animated by a force I do not understand.

 

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The Riff Raff Podcast

 

Back in May, I had the delight of meeting with The Riff Raff founders Amy Baker and Rosy Edwards and appearing at their Effra Social event (as reported here) AND while I was there, Amy and Rosy interviewed me for their podcast. It was so much fun to do and you can listen to the whole thing here.

 

It’s about half an hour long. and covers topics like how one writes, the oddities that come out of travelling for research, and finding your genre. I hope you enjoy.

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Not the Booker Nominations

 

have a lovely cat to counter this slightly needy post

It’s that time of year again – the Guardian’s Not The Booker Award, where readers can nominate and vote for the best book of the year. And my book is eligible for nomination!

 

All you have to do is to follow this link, sign in to the Guardian (it’s free) and leave the following ‘Nomination: Flesh of the Peach by Helen McClory’. You can add more if you like. The nominating process is open until the 30th of July. From then on, the longlist becomes a voting pool, and I’ll have more info on that nearer the time. Suffice to say, it’s not a complex process, but one that involves a popularity contest.

Please consider helping my book out, if you enjoyed it, or simply if you can – you don’t have to have read it, at this stage.

If you haven’t read the book yet, you can buy it here with free int. shipping,

Thank you so much for your time and your nominations  – and I’ll be posting again for the voting stage.

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An American Road Trip ‘Playlist’ of Books

 

Today you can read your way across America with me – over on Books for Women, Women’s Books:

 

NEW YORK CITY:  All aboard at Port Authority Bus Terminal. Find your seat and strap in. There are so many choices for the city that loves to read about itself, so I’ve gone for two…

Read more here!

 

Also you might have missed these two excellent reviews of Flesh of the Peach, in Scots Whay Hae and The Bottle Imp. My heart.

 

Additionally, some good things are brewing with both On the Edges of Vision, currently out of print after the shuttering of Queen’s Ferry Press, as well as for the nascent second collection (and the novella that goes along with it). Firm news when I have it to share.

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Papertrail Podcast Interview + Interview for the Caledonian Novel Award Blog

 

D and I have been away for the past few days, spending my birthday on the NC500, the route around Scotland’s three coasts (from above Inverness). Now we’re back, and I can share some things which appeared while I was mostly beyond the reach of navigable internet.

 

Firstly, here’s a written interview for the Caledonian Novel Award:

 

Welcome, Helen, and huge congratulations on the very recent publication of your first novel! Flesh of the Peach is an intense, candid story of a woman confronting grief, loss, and an, at times, harrowing childhood, and is set in New York, Cornwall and the American Southwest. Which parts of the novel did you find the easiest and the most difficult to write?

I think the easiest parts were the sections on how Sarah (my protagonist) would spend her money – they are flash-fiction fantasies inserted into the main body of the text, and not haunted overmuch by the more emotionally wrenching elements of the rest of the novel. The hardest parts were any of the ones I had to edit extensively, as I find editing the most arduous part of writing. So that’s every other section, really. It takes a long time to get it right, from feelings to getting characters to pick up a coffee cup.

 

Read more in the link above.

 

Next, make yourself a cup of tea for the Papertrail podcast interview, in which the host and I discuss three books I picked for examination + the line between whimsy and horror + how other works inspire my writing.

 

 

Finally – by the time this post goes live, tickets for the 2017 Edinburgh International Book Festival will have gone on sale and you can come along to see Meena Kandasamy and me in conversation with chair Lee Randall talking about our fiction on the 15th of August. Buy tickets for our event here!

 

 

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The Unsung Letter No 22

I immediately fell in love with the novella and Gurba’s narrator Desiree Garcia when I read it earlier this year. I devoured most of the book whilst waiting for a flight and during the subsequent airplane journey itself – actually the perfect place to absorb this novel which has a main character grappling with all the things going on inside her head as well as around her. 

Read more – subscribe to The Unsung Letter, a weekly missive on an underhyped book, sung to the rafters by a different writer/critic/book pusher each time. This week it’s New Zealander Andrea Quinlan.

 

Just a quick one this week  – I’m off to Leeds to read at Blackwells with three other debut novelists. Also – yesterday the Edinburgh International Book Festival catalogue was released: check out who is in it! Tickets go on sale next Tuesday, and a link will be here then.

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Reading in Leeds – 14th of June

From the eventbrite page

 

I will be reading in Blackwell’s Leeds on Wednesday, with Clare Fisher (All the Good Things), Luiza Sauma (Flesh and Bone and Water) and June Taylor (Losing Juliet) at 6.30pm. You can get free tickets here, and we’ll be talking about the road to publication and our writing and generally answering any questions that come up. A reminder – the Goodreads giveaway of Flesh of the Peach ends on Tuesday at midnight, GMT. It’s open to residents of the UK, Canada, USA and Australia.

 

I’ll also be in Manchester that day, mooching around bookshops and fortifying myself with cups of tea. I love Manchester but haven’t been in years, so this is very welcome. Before heading through to Leeds, I’m going to be meeting up for a session with The End of All Things podcast, which is one of my absolute favourites. Recommended listening for writers and readers who like a slice of political awareness with their fictions.

 

And then and then – another event coming up in Edinburgh at the end of the month. But more later. The sun is out, and it is not the end of all things yet, though half this complicated Year of Our Lord 2017 is behind us. Always more rushing towards us like a shadowy wave. Take a breath. Take a sip of tea. Wait in the sunshine. Listen to a podcast episode while your hands do other, easier, work.

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