Of Hargate Hall

-Rather than of the wedding D and I attended, which was full of light and bustle and food and good cheer, this post is about the venue itself. About the feeling it carried, subtle, overwhelmed by the good mood of our party (70 odd souls and three dogs).

 

Hargate Hall, Friday, early evening. That white tent is a marquee.

Hargate Hall, Friday, early evening. That white tent is a marquee.

 

You could say it was the perfect setting for hush, for suspense. For reading at the windows, looking out across the stumbling, black-tree garden. Hargate Hall was built (so a photograph in the entrance-way told us) in 1899, so not very old by the standards of English Country Houses. In little over 15 years after its construction, the facade of the aristocracy would begin to crack with the onset of World War One.

 

Nowadays it’s a collection of self-catering apartments adjoining a fantastic central hall replete with stained glass windows with pseudo-heraldry, and a spiked candelabra hanging from the ceiling. We stayed in a low mezzanine, located up a steep wooden ladder and overhanging a small central room. It was like staying in a cosier treehouse.

 

On that first evening, D and I walked the grounds through the soft wet mist as it grew darker.

 

the flash reflecting off the white mist, just outside our kitchen.

the flash reflecting off the white mist, just outside our kitchen.

 

The garden path curves both up and down. We followed the downward path first, by the marquee and into the thin woodland.

 

hargate hall 3

 

we found this little...house? It is used for wedding ceremonies in warmer weather. Here it stared at us mournful, open mouthed

we found this little…house? It is used for wedding ceremonies in warmer weather. Here it stared at us mournful, open mouthed

 

 

This ghostly gate marked the edge of Hargate Hall's lands. Beyond was a farm reeking of the cows.

This ghostly gate marked the edge of Hargate Hall’s lands. Beyond was a farm reeking of the cows.

 

The light was beginning to go, and my poor wee camera struggled to keep up. It’s hard to capture the atmosphere under such conditions. It wasn’t eerie – I have been in eerie places – but was instead still. Stoic.

 

The farm, the drystane walls shelving the fields off into the close horizon

The farm, the drystane walls shelving the fields off into the close horizon

 

hargate hall 4

 

We wandered round along the main road and towards the gates of the hall. I’d like to say I had time then to read The Secret History (it would I think have been a perfect choice – second only to The Little Stranger) but there was far too much to do and far too many people to meet. The same of course was true of Saturday, the day of the wedding itself. But the evening of the second day brought snow, and our last morning saw Hargate Hall and the farmlands covered white.

 

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One last shot of the hall itself. We had to take a taxi and then a five hour train ride back north. It’s funny though, on the ride to Buxton train station, the driver referred to us coming ‘up’ to the Peak District, though he had already asked where we were from. Perhaps he misspoke, or perhaps it was something to do with where he felt situated – Northern, already. It always strikes me strangely, to hear of ‘the North’ on the BBC weather forecasts, when there’s so much more north. It reinforces the idea that Scotland is, to those who live below it, a different country, though they might in other respects (and irksomely to those who believe otherwise) refer to Scotland as a region. A region North of Thule, I suppose.

 

From the train we watched the snow storm follow us into the North, skittering the higher lands and leaving the valleys green and then, further, the tufty brown of semi-moorland, then green once again. I began The Secret History, but still have much to go. It seems so far like a slip of caramel over a big white plate – flavourful, but. More coherence (possibly) later. Thanks to all who wished us a good trip. It was.

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12 Comments

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12 responses to “Of Hargate Hall

  1. I’d heard of the Lake District, but not the Peak District, before. Wikipedia says it’s “an upland area,” so maybe that’s why the taxi driver said “up.” (Or, like me, he’s geographically challenged and always gets where things are mixed up. I used to live where there are mountains, and that was always the west, and it was so much easier to tell direction then.)

    I love your photos and this looks like a really cool place to have a wedding…or just to be. (The shot of the house lit up through the trees is wonderful.) I dream of staying in an old English (or Scottish–even better!) hall, surrounded by mist. That’s probably very American of me, huh? (I really do prefer gray days to sunny, though.)

    • I think you might be on to something with that uplands thought.

      I dream of driving through deep dark north american woods and mountains, or striking out across a broad desert – the urge to be in another, unknown place – we have that in common.

  2. Beautiful photographs, Helen. Full of distant mystery and spirit.

  3. The mist is like what I’ve been seeing out of my front window in the mornings of late, sans the charming architecture and the snow… Lovely photos.

    They call San Francisco “Northern California” too, even though it’s only about halfway up the coast. Really irritates the people who live in the real north of California, near the Oregon border…

  4. I marvel at the winter weather reports for our northern states, like Minnesota and Wisconsin, and how they are suffering in the cold and snow then realize that north of them is an entire other country!

  5. Thank you for such a good write up. You are welcome back any time. Perhaps in the sunshine next time, rather than the snow and fog though!

  6. What a difference that bit of snow makes…truly wonderful photos, Helen.

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